Friday, May 25, 2007

What's In a Day?

Pentecost is upon us. It doesn't get celebrated like Easter or Christmas, maybe it should. Then again it's hard for me to see any need to treat one day as more important than any other.

In my view everyday is Christmas, a day to gratefully acknowledge the incarnation of God the Son in human form. Without his willingness to empty himself of divine prerogative, to be found in a form like ours, the lamb who was slain from the foundation of the world would never have been slain at all. Then our sin would still be ours to pay for-- perish the thought!

Everyday is Easter to me as well, a day to joyfully celebrate the resurrection of the Lord. If he had not bodily walked out of that tomb, we'd have nothing. Anyone can make an outrageous claim to be God and to know the secret of life. Anyone's followers could spin their guru's death after he was gone as an altruistic martyrdom. But where would that leave things? Nowhere with certainty. How can we know a messianic claimant has the goods to deliver? Simple, let him defeat the ultimate foe-- death! We know for certain that what Jesus did worked because he rose bodily from the grave. How do I know there's hope in eternity for me. What he did, he promised I will do too. How exciting!

Everyday is Pentecost for me too (at least since April of 1980), a day to experience the discernible fellowship of the Holy Spirit. Jesus thought it was important for his disciples, after they had known him as the risen Lord, to wait until they were endued with power from on high before they went out to be the witnessing church. I'm glad the experience happened early in my Christian life, before I pursued God's calling for my life.

I once heard a preacher say that he was a Calarminibapticostal. That's a mouthful, for sure, but today like everyday, I celebrate Pentechristeaster! God is with me, now and forever, so what's in a day anyhow?

4 comments:

  1. We should celebrate Pentecost Sunday, it's the only day the Hallmark culture hasn't destroyed and commercialized. A true Holy-day.

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  2. Can't say you don't have a point. The card companies were not satisfied with commercializing all of our special days, so they invented a number of their own (which I will not name to protect me from the wrath of all the females in my life). Does anything good come out of the crossing of capitalism and Christianity?

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  3. Too many folks have pursued their calling w/o the infilling of the Holy Spirit.

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  4. Sista C,
    That is a truly sad thought, and perhaps explains why so many "innovations" and so much religiousity has been foisted upon the world and the church in guise of ministry. The anointing breaks the yoke, the only thing human effort breaks is the yolk!

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